Metabolic and Cardiovascular Training

Part four: Components of an effective workout – Metabolic and Cardiovascular Training

Kim Munson

components4

Components of an effective workout

Metabolic training can be thought of as performing exercises at a high intensity with little to no rest, with the goals of increasing heart rate (cardiovascular training), and metabolism (the rate at which your body burns calories after exercise, even at rest).  By keeping the quality of the work periods high and the rest periods short, you get both the benefits of strength training and cardio, in a routine that takes little time, torches calories and melts fat. In fact, this type of metabolic training has been shown to be more effective than steady state cardio for both fat loss and cardio conditioning.

One form of metabolic training is known as High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). Exercises are performed for a shot period of time at maximal effort, followed by a short period of rest. The key is to keep the intensity of the work periods high, and the rest minimal. Workouts are therefore usually short, but the effort is maximal, so they are by no means easy.

Because this style of workout is so effective at boosting metabolism and torching calories in a short amount of time, it can also be added to the end of a workout as a “finisher”.  Adding finishers to your workouts are excellent ways to bump up your metabolism and break through a fat loss plateau.  They are also an easy way to get your cardio in, in a short amount of time.

I’ve created a high intensity metabolic strength circuit you can do anywhere, using just your bodyweight. I’ve also given you a finisher that you can add on to any of your existing workouts, or use for days when you are super short on time.  Make sure to properly warm up before performing any high intensity exercise. (See my active and dynamic workout here)

The Workout: Metabolic Circuit

Circuit style HIIT workout consisting of eight exercises, each performed for a set amount of time with a corresponding rest time; done EMOM style (every minute on the minute). Complete one round and take a 2-4 minute break, follow with a second round. You will need an interval timer or stop watch.

Use the work to rest periods as follows:

  • Beginners: 20 seconds work/ 40 seconds rest
  • Intermediate: 30 seconds work/ 30 seconds rest
  • Advanced: 40 seconds work/ 20 seconds rest

Key Points

  • Keep the intensity high; Maximal effort
  • Keep the quality high and maintain correct technique
  • Always perform a warm up before doing any type of high intensity exercise

The Exercises

  1. Skater Hops
  2. Push Up (int/advanced) / modified push up (beginner)
  3. Plank March (int/advanced) / Plank hold (beginner)
  4. Jumping Jacks
  5. Lunge Matrix
  6. Table-top Bridge
  7. Plank Spiderman
  8. Jumping Jacks


The Finisher: Density Circuit

Bodyweight Density Circuit; Four minutes, AMRAP (as many rounds as possible)

Do the listed number of reps for each exercise before moving on to the next. Repeat as many rounds as possible in the four minutes. You will need a stop watch.

Key Points

  • Keep the intensity high; Maximal effort
  • Keep the quality high and maintain correct technique
  • Always perform a warm up before doing any type of high intensity exercise

The Exercises

  1. Jump out squats (8)
  2. Plank push ups (6)
  3. Burpees (no push up) (4)


Only have 15-20 minutes to workout?

I suggest doing one round of the above HIIT workout (8 minutes) plus one round of the “Finisher” (4 minutes). Add an active/dynamic warm up for a complete workout. (See Part two of Components of an effective workout: Active and Dynamic Warm Up). Also, feel free to just do the finisher (after a warm up) if you’re really pressed for time! You’ll get quality work in a short amount of time.


Ready to take your fitness to the next level? Contact me for a free consultation and personal training session, or take advantage of one of our introductory offers for small group bootcamp. I can help you find the right program.

Be sure to subscribe to my blog so you don’t miss the other posts in this series! Look for my next post in this series about mobility and flexibility work.

 

 

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